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2019 Annual Convention Speakers
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2019 Convention Speakers

Legislative Update

Nora Belcher photo
Nora Belcher
Executive Director, Texas e-Health Alliance
Nora Belcher is the Executive Director of the Texas e-Health Alliance, a non-profit advocacy group that she started in 2009 to give health information technology stakeholders a voice in public policy. TeHA serves as the state's leading advocate, from local communities to the national level, for the use of information technology to improve the health care system for patients. Ms. Belcher had previously worked in the private sector as a consultant advising health information technology companies on how to do business with government. She also served in Governor Perry's office for five years as deputy director in the Governor’s Office of Budget, Planning and Policy, where she was responsible for managing the policy and budget issues for the Texas health and human services system. Ms. Belcher holds a bachelor’s degree in government from the University of Texas at Austin and owns a hardcover first edition of Game of Thrones.

Abstract
The 2019 session of the Texas Legislature was a very busy one for the health information technology community. Legislators considered a host of policy topics, from how to respond to the opioid crisis to cybersecurity for state agencies, to how best to use remote patient monitoring in the Medicaid program. Providers, vendors, and other stakeholders were debating these issues too, while the legislature was talking on big ticket issues related to property taxes and education funding. In this session, Nora Belcher, executive director of the Texas e-Health Alliance, will review legislative activity related to health information technology, discuss how HIT issues are perceived by state legislators and regulators, and provide HIM professionals with insights on how these topics will affect their work and personal lives.

Your Role in Today’s Healthcare Eco-System as HIM is Reimagined

Rita Bowen
Program Director, External Payer Audits, Children's Health System of Texas
In her role as Vice President of Privacy, Compliance and HIM Policy for MRO, Bowen serves as the company’s Privacy and Compliance Officer (PCO), overseeing the company’s compliance with HIPAA and chairing the organization’s Data Protection Steering Committee. In addition, she ensures new and existing client HIM policies and procedures are to code. She has more than 40 years of experience in Health Information Management (HIM), holding a variety of HIM director and consulting roles. Prior to joining MRO, she was Senior Vice President and Privacy Officer for HealthPort, Inc., now known as CIOX Health. Bowen is an active member of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), having served as its President and Board Chair, as a member of the Board of Directors, of the Council on Certification, and various focus and specialty groups, such as privacy. Additionally, Bowen is a former chair for the AHIMA Foundation. She has been honored with AHIMA’s Triumph Award in the mentor category; she is also the recipient of the Distinguished Member Award from AHIMA’s Quality Specialty Group and the Tennessee Health Information Management Association (THIMA). Bowen has served as President for both the Arizona Health Information Management Association (AzHIMA) and THIMA, and served in AHIMA’s House of Delegates. Bowen is an established author and speaker on HIM topics and has taught HIM studies at Chattanooga State and the University of Tennessee Memphis. Bowen holds a Bachelor of Medical Science degree with a focus in medical record administration and a Master’s degree in Health Information/ Informatics Management Technology.

Abstract
Today’s HIM professionals must evaluate their work environment and imagine how their profession and required skill sets will evolve with ongoing industry changes, including advancements in technology. This interactive session will explore new opportunities and roles to be considered, and pathways to the future state including training and education, and partnerships through outsourcing.

Leadership: Tomorrow Doesn't Look Much Like Yesterday

Penny Crow photo
Penny Crow, MS, RHIA
Principal, Brittain-Kalish Group, LLC
Penny Crow, RHIA, MS, I-O Psychology, is a nationally recognized executive with progressive senior leadership experience in a wide range of healthcare organizations. As an RHIA, she has a successful track record in health information management, revenue cycle, risk management and quality improvement. As an I-O Psychologist, she is passionate about working with leaders to develop strategic thinking skills. She created the Strategic Thinking Tool Kit- PILLARS to provide a thinking framework which leaders can use for faster, more objective, and more effective decision-making. In addition, Penny assists organizations to prepare their workforce for the demands of the future by moving them from specialists to multi-specialists. Penny enjoys working with hospital leadership to create a more desirable organization for employees and patients alike. She is active in the American Health Information Management Association, Texas Health Information Management Association, American Healthcare Human Resources Association, and Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychologists. She is currently the board president for Texas Health Information Management Association and Past President for Texas e-Health Alliance.

Christine Kalish photo
Christine Kalish, MBA, CMPE
President /CEO, Brittain-Kalish Group, LLC
Chris Kalish is a management consultant specializing in guiding healthcare provider organizations through the challenges and opportunities of healthcare reform. As the CEO of BKG, she leads the team, developing strategic relationships with clients and business partners, continually looking for different ways to assist all BKG’s partners in delivering quality services and care for the populations they serve.

Qualifications include:
Health Services Administration undergraduate
Certified Medical Practice Executive – MGMA
Practice Management Executive
Texas Christian University, Neeley School of Business
Several program advisory board roles
University of North Texas Health Science Center School of Public Health
Several program advisory board roles
Adjunct Faculty
Lifelong learner and overachiever

Abstract
As the business of healthcare changes, so do the needs of the workforce. Leadership is not the same as it was yesterday. This interactive and fast-paced class will develop skills, such as strategic thinking, communication strategies, delegation and accountability, wellbeing, and information governance. We will talk about employee engagement, professional development, and what workforce needs have changed. This class is for anyone currently with direct reports, or someone that is interested in leading people.

Course objectives
  • Explore thinking frameworks as a leadership tool.
  • Identify communication strategies for the new workforce.
  • Use delegation and accountability as an empowerment tool.
  • Review the leadership skills that Cleveland Clinic is requiring for providers.


Mortality index, understanding the intersection of population health and healthcare delivery.

Tu-Quynh Edwards, MD, MS, CCDS
Manager, Clinical Documentation Improvement, UTMB Health
Tu-Quynh Edwards completed her Internal Medicine & Pediatrics residency and adult Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine fellowship, at the University of Texas Medical Branch. She is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Pulmonary Medicine, with experience in quality and process improvement. Dr. Edwards also completed her Masters of Clinical Science in Health Services Research, with a focus on claims data research to examine patterns of care for lung cancer survivors. With a vested interest in documentation integrity and a desire to achieve better work-life balance, Dr. Edwards made the transition from clinical practice to Clinical Documentation Improvement, where she has made great strides with physician education, quality outcome metrics, and applications of clinical data analytics. She is a Certified Clinical Documentation Specialist, and currently serves as Manager of Clinical Documentation Improvement at UTMB Health.

Abstract
In 2015, University of Texas System Chancellor William H. McRaven challenged all UT health care campuses to improve their quality performance to rank among the top 20 academic medical centers (AMCs) in the nation. In response, UTMB launched the Best Care initiative in June 2016 with a goal to move from a 3-star performer in 76th position in the Vizient Quality and Accountability Study to become a top 20 academic health center. Baseline data analysis was used to identify workstreams and target diagnoses with most opportunity for improvement. Data scorecards – visible at all times on the institution’s intranet-- were created in order to inform policies and process flows, and to track improvement over time. These scorecards were also employed by a Clinical Documentation Improvement (CDI)-led campaign for providers and coders that included a variety of educational activities: dissemination of documentation guidelines and tips, distribution of quick reference cards, creation of institutional guidelines for specific target diagnoses, performance of in-depth critical review of inpatient documentation, and monthly monitoring of CC-MCC capture. The comprehensive, transparent, data-driven Best Care initiative led to increased employee engagement and an institutional improvement to the 4th position in the 2018 Vizient Study.

Excel for Data Analytics

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Susan Fenton, PhD, RHIA, CPHI, FAHIMA
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, UT School of Biomedical Informatics
Susan H. Fenton is an Associate Professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Texas School of Biomedical Informatics in Houston, TX. She is responsible for their graduate certificates, master’s and doctoral degree programs. She recently led the development of the nation’s first practice doctorate in health informatics (DHI). Dr. Fenton has received more than $7 million in grant funding and also serves on a variety of regional and national professional association committees and boards. Dr. Fenton has more than 30 years experience in health informatics and health information management. Dr. Fenton holds a B.S. in health information management from UTMB in Galveston, an MBA from the University of Houston and a PhD in health services research from Texas A&M.

Abstract
Are you interested in analytics, but leery of applications such as R and Python. The good news is that MS Excel has many functions, including the Data Analysis Toolpak, pivot tables, and more that can help you step into the world of analytics. This session will use publicly available datasets to introduce advanced Excel options for your HIM operations analytics needs. All attendees will need to bring a laptop computer (tablets will not be adequate).

Preparing for the Future of Work

Susan Fenton photo
Susan Fenton, PhD, RHIA, CPHI, FAHIMA
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, UT School of Biomedical Informatics
Susan H. Fenton is an Associate Professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Texas School of Biomedical Informatics in Houston, TX. She is responsible for their graduate certificates, master’s and doctoral degree programs. She recently led the development of the nation’s first practice doctorate in health informatics (DHI). Dr. Fenton has received more than $7 million in grant funding and also serves on a variety of regional and national professional association committees and boards. Dr. Fenton has more than 30 years experience in health informatics and health information management. Dr. Fenton holds a B.S. in health information management from UTMB in Galveston, an MBA from the University of Houston and a PhD in health services research from Texas A&M.

Abstract
Well-known changes have already occurred in medical transcription, banking, education, and retail business. Technical forces, such as the internet, big data, increasing computational power, the Internet of Things, along with societal forces such as generational differences, disparities in access to technology, the aging of many societies, as well as emerging countries and projected changes will also impact our future workplaces. The future of the health information management profession will be explored related to these forces. Needed knowledge and skills, such as critical and creative thinking, the ability to make sense of novel situations, computational thinking, working effectively in virtual teams and across cultural and other differences to prepare for the projected future will be reviewed. Resources, such as professional associations, online training, and higher education, will be suggested for acquiring the necessary knowledge and skills.

Leading the Charge - HIM driven Charge Capture

Pamala Foster photo
Pamala Foster, RHIT, CCS
HIM Supervisor Revenue Integrity and Charge Capture, JPS Health Network
Pamala Foster is the HIM Supervisor over Revenue Integrity and Charge Capture at JPS Health Network in Ft. Worth and has 10 years of HIM experience with a focus on Revenue Integrity. Ms. Foster is a recent graduate of Western Governors University where she received her Bachelors in Health Information Management. She currently has RHIT, CCS, and is CompTIA Project+ Certified and is an active member of TxHIMA and AHIMA.

Sherri Shockey photo
Sherri Shockey, CCS, CCS-P, CCDS, CHC
Director of Health Information Management, JPS Health Network
Sherri Shockey is the Director of Health Information Management Services at JPS Health Network in Ft. Worth and has over 30 years of HIM experience with a focus on Coding and Compliance. Shockey has oversight of over 100 team members. She currently has CCS, CCS-P, CCDS, CHC, and is CompTIA Project+ Certified and is an active member of TxHIMA, AHIMA, ACDIS, and HCCA.

Abstract
In 2017, Health Information Management (HIM) at JPS Health Network was approached by the Emergency Department about taking over their charge capture process. In doing so, we were able to more closely align the charge capture process with coding in the revenue cycle, and to identify incomplete or missed charge opportunities in the Emergency Department.

After assessing the current process we found significant issues in the charging of medication administration, lacking or inconsistent documentation, and a breakdown in the communication between the charge capture team and the coding team when a discrepancy in charging/coding was identified.

Due to focused retraining and education, HIM was able to increase compliant revenue and usage by 22% (approximately 45 Million dollars) despite a 10% reduction in patient encounters over the course of fiscal year 2018.

Insights into the Next Revision: Like Texas, Everything is Bigger in ICD-11

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Kathy Giannangelo
President, Kathy Giannangelo Consulting, LLC
Kathy Giannangelo has a comprehensive clinical terminologies, classification, and data standards background with extensive experience in the health information management and informatics field. Her current consulting business clients include RKL Health Informatics and the American Medical Association.

She was map lead for SNOMED International for over 5 years and she also taught a graduate level course on clinical terminology systems. Previous positions include coding specialist for the National Committee for Quality Assurance, director of content management for Apelon, Inc., and medical informaticist with Language and Computing. Kathy has worked in various HIM roles, including director, practice leadership with AHIMA, senior nosologist, vice president of product development, education specialist, director of medical records, quality assurance coordinator, and CDC research team manager.

She lives in the US in Springfield Illinois with her husband and three cats, Simone, Pavel, and Abs, of which two are named after Detroit Red Wings hockey players as she is an avid fan of the team.

Abstract
Eighteen years after the launch of ICD-10, WHO published ICD-11 for Mortality and Morbidity Statistics (ICD-11-MMS). Attend this session and learn the overall architecture of ICD-11 along with its key features. Leave with insights into what ICD-11 has in store for HIM to help plan your strategy.

Deficiency Management: The Full Circle Journey

Valerie Lund
Manager, HIM Document Compliance, JPS Health Network
Valerie Lund is a Manager, HIM Document Compliance with the Health Information Management (HIM) department at JPS Health Network in the Finance Division. She received a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from the University of Texas at Arlington. Mrs. Lund is Greenbelt trained in Lean Six Sigma and is currently involved in several projects at JPS Health Network including review of copy and paste procedures, verbal order management, and other missing documentation cleanup efforts. Mrs. Lund’s work on documentation compliance (inpatient, outpatient, and copy-paste behaviors) has won several awards over the last three years at the JPS Quality Fair. Mrs. Lund has been recognized multiple times for promoting one or more of the JPS values of Trust, Mutual Respect, Excellence, Integrity, Accountability, and Teamwork. Mrs. Lund is also a busy mom of three young boys. She serves on the PTA Board at their elementary and middle school, assists with baseball, and holds leadership positions in their Cub Scout Pack.

Abstract
Over the last three years the Health Information Management (HIM) at JPS Health Network has completely revamped the way it manages documentation, co-signatures, and chart closure. HIM has worked with the Medical Records Committee (MRC) and Medical Executive Committee (MEC), IT Epic Reporting Team, and partnered with Network Providers across all departments to reduce the volume and age of open charts, chart co-signatures, and inpatient deficiencies. Open charts, missing co-signatures, and missing documentation have the potential to impact the quality of patient care and hospital reimbursement as well as result in regulatory findings. The JPS team worked to create a collaborative culture between HIM and JPS providers including concerted efforts from key MRC members and Physician Champions across several service lines in order to influence completion of all documentation in less time than is required by regulatory standards. The result is compliance in chart completion, co-signature, and documentation. During this course, the process has grown to include additional inclusion criteria and lowered completion thresholds and yet continue to meet or exceed previous measures of success. Future expansions include a closer look at verbal orders.

Transforming health care: the strategic role of HIM

Dan Wilson
CEO, Moxe Health
Dan has worked at the ground level to execute large-scale IT projects, advised lawmakers on the benefits of an open internet, and built a company to align stakeholders around sharing robust clinical data. He's lived the transformation - and pain - that comes with new technology, policies, and business models.

In 2012 Dan founded Moxe, a health technology company based in Madison, Wisconsin. Moxe works with health insurers and health systems to enable bi-directional clinical data exchange to support payment and operational uses. Network partners have removed inefficiencies, increased revenues, and successfully adopted value-based contracts. Serving as the CEO since Moxe’s founding, he has grown the Moxe network to stretch across 23 states and cover millions of patients.

Abstract
HIM departments should be a strategic asset within every health system. At the core of the health care industry's transformation is a need for controlled, efficient access to the right data. In this presentation, we'll discuss three large disruptors currently impacting HIM: mergers, the spread of new payment models, and the availability of new technologies.

  • In 2017, there were 115 mergers of health systems announced, breaking all previous records. 10 of these were mega-mergers, with the selling organization having revenues over $1 billion. The total value of merger deals continued to increase in 2018.
  • ACOs continue to grow, covering 32.7 million lives in Q1 2018. Adoption of value-based payment models within Medicare and commercial markets continues to grow, with thousands of organizations participating across the country.
HIM, as the owner of medical, administrative, and other critical data, is uniquely positioned to act as the brain-center for turning these challenges into strategic capabilities. This presentation walks through some key disruptions in the health care industry and shows how HIM departments can turn uncertainty into an opportunity for growth.

CDI Across the Continuum of Care

Kathy Giannangelo photo
Brian O’Rourke
Revenue Cycle Solutions Executive, 3M Health Information Systems
Brian O’Rourke is a Revenue Cycle Solutions Executive with 3M Health Information Systems. He has over 30 years’ experience in healthcare, working with providers of all sizes throughout the country including public, not-for-profit and academic health systems to improve overall revenue cycle performance and Quality. Brian has focused in the areas of Performance improvement, Revenue Cycle, Supply Chain and Clinical Information Systems and Analytics, as well as Clinical Process Improvement and Hospital and Physician Alignment. Prior to joining 3M, Brian held business development leadership positions with some of the nation’s major healthcare consulting practices, distribution, manufacturing and technology firms including, HealthGrades, Owens & Minor, HCIA, and Procter & Gamble. He is based in Cedarburg, WI.

Abstract
Hierarchical Condition Categories (HCCs) are the underlying risk adjustment for many Medicare programs as CMS shifts towards value-based payment. While many health systems have invested heavily in clinical documentation improvement for the inpatient setting, physicians in outpatient settings receive limited guidance on diagnosis capture. They become focused on coding diagnoses to support CPT/E&M coding, not on capturing each patient’s full disease burden for HCCs and RAF scores. HCCs are different from DRG-based risk adjustment because they are calculated for a patient over a period of time—usually a year—across all inpatient, outpatient and physician office settings. This means that all relevant conditions must be treated, documented, coded and billed each calendar year in at least one of these care settings. To further complicate things, HCC’s are “applicable” in any care setting, which is forcing Systems to consider delivering CDI across the full care continuum. This presentation will provide attendees with an in-depth understanding of risk adjustment and Hierarchical Condition Codes (HCCs), and provide points for consideration as their organization evaluates how best to capture complete and accurate documentation wherever the patient is treated. The session will help attendees answer the question: As the stewards of health information, how can HIM professionals help ensure that the health of a population is accurately reflected in documentation and coding?

HIM and HIT: Effectiveness in the Enterprise

Cecilia Plata, RHIA, CPHI, CHP
HIM Consultant, Interim Director and Epic Implementation, Harmony Health
Cecilia Plata has been HIM Director for four Epic implementations during the past ten years.

From these experiences, I have been impressed with the number of HIM leaders and managers who do not attempt to be technically competent.

Abstract
HIM and HIT (Health Information MANAGEMENT and TECHNOLOGY) in collaboration with all caregivers, managers and contractors in the enterprise celebrate the success to date in optimizing the EHR. The transition from the all human-labor paper Patient Chart to an EHR has been phenomenal. Yet, no one is satisfied until the EHR meets the industry goal of at least 90% automation. An immediate goal is to stop scanning. Optimization of processes, accuracy and completeness remains unfinished. Harvesting “low hanging fruit" has been remarkable and inspires perseverance, communication, planning and pilot-testing of potential improvements. Everyone's creativity is needed to pave the road to success. This presentation introduces the EHR as a living product of joint human-machine work. This concept, in early use in other industries, may accelerate EHR development. How the MINDSET of well-intended team problem solvers may subconsciously cloud or block solutions is explored. The long road to a frozen mindset is briefly reviewed (genetics, ancestry, legacy cultural and language environments, education at all levels, religious dogma, political tradition, etc.). Focus is on those in our workforce who inhabit four (4) of the 16 Occupational Clusters (US Depts. of Labor and Education). This often reveals their pathway to their occupation and tier attained within the cluster and our organization. It also hints about background influences on MINDSETS when a team addresses a process challenge. Simple exercises offer ways to learn how to safely hear and be heard in development and trouble-shooting teams.

How CDI affects Performance Improvement

Jyoti Sharma
Corporate Coding Manager, Children's Health
I am a corporate coding manager for Children's Health in Dallas. I have worked for many organizations like Baylor, Parkland, Tenet and several consulting companies. I have been a coder, quality analyst and I have also been in management that includes director as well as manager. I have also written 3 books, that includes CCS exam review in ICD-9 and ICD-10 along with RAC/MAC/HAC audit. I have also worked as RAC reviewer for Region C, and that gave me an opportunity to know about many hospitals and the way they do coding.

Abstract
Clinical documentation improvement can help organization to have better report card on performance improvement. If patient has died and patient's severity of illness and risk of mortality are not to the highest such as 4 and 4, it can be questionable. For example, physician documents patient died due to multi-organ failure, but coders won't be able to capture that code. There is no code in ICD-10-CM, that captures multi-organ failure. It has to be spelled out the specificity of each body organ such as, if it is acute or chronic, or body part such as heart, liver etc.

Improving clinical documentation increases the revenue as well as, it helps in performance improvement.

If patient has mid line shift, CDI specialist should send a query asking for clarification if patient has cerebral edema. Cerebral edema is an MCC, and it also increases the SOI and ROM.

SQL for the Absolute Beginner

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Kimberly Smith, PhD, MT(ASCP)
Assistant Professor, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Biomedical Informatics
Dr. Smith holds a PhD in Health Informatics and is also a medical technologist (medical laboratory scientist). She is an assistant professor of biomedical informatics in the School of Biomedical Informatics at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. She teaches introductory courses in biomedical informatics and has earned the prestigious John P. McGovern Outstanding Teacher Award. She also taught in The University of Texas at Austin's Health IT professional education certificate program, covering topics such as electronic health records, standards and vocabularies, HL7, and databases and basic SQL queries. Before entering academia, she obtained over 15 years of hands-on experience implementing, supporting, and managing laboratory and anatomic pathology information systems, including for MD Anderson Cancer Center. She also worked for five health information system vendors, implementing and supporting clinical laboratory and anatomic pathology systems for over fifty hospitals.

Abstract
Have you wanted to get started in data analytics, but don’t know where to begin? Is the statement SELECT * FROM Patients; unfamiliar? If you answered “yes” to these questions, then this workshop is for you! Structured Query Language (SQL) is the language people use to extract data from the databases used in most health information systems today, including electronic health record systems. This hands-on workshop is intended for the person who has no experience with databases or SQL. By the end of the workshop, you will know how to:
  • Use DESCRIBE, SELECT, and WHERE to perform simple queries
  • Describe the difference between * and wildcard characters and correctly use them
  • Use pattern matching with LIKE, NOT LIKE, and =
  • Use Boolean operators AND, OR, and NOT
  • Perform basic mathematical functions with SQL, such as averages and counts
  • Use JOIN to combine data from two tables
Requirements
  • Participants must provide a Windows or Mac laptop with at least 10 GB of free disk space
  • Participants must be able to install software on their laptop from either an internet site or from a USB thumb/flash drive.
  • Participants using hospital-issued or corporate-issued laptops must confirm with their IT department that they have permission to install software (Oracle VirtualBox), and are able to copy a provided virtual machine to their computer, either via download or via USB (using Aegis SecureKey).
  • The School of Biomedical Informatics will provide a website for downloading the required virtual machine file. However, this file is approximately 4.5 GB, and conference internet service usually is too slow to download such a large file for multiple people simultaneously. Therefore, I will require that an email be sent to registered participants about one week prior to the workshop, asking them to download the required files before coming to the workshop. I will guide participants through the installation process in the first half-hour of the workshop.
  • Limited to maximum of 20 participants.

The Future of Work: Prepare Yourself

Kimberly Smith photo
Kimberly Smith, PhD, MT(ASCP)
Assistant Professor, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Biomedical Informatics
Dr. Smith holds a PhD in Health Informatics and is also a medical technologist (medical laboratory scientist). She is an assistant professor of biomedical informatics in the School of Biomedical Informatics at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. She teaches introductory courses in biomedical informatics and has earned the prestigious John P. McGovern Outstanding Teacher Award. She also taught in The University of Texas at Austin's Health IT professional education certificate program, covering topics such as electronic health records, standards and vocabularies, HL7, and databases and basic SQL queries. Before entering academia, she obtained over 15 years of hands-on experience implementing, supporting, and managing laboratory and anatomic pathology information systems, including for MD Anderson Cancer Center. She also worked for five health information system vendors, implementing and supporting clinical laboratory and anatomic pathology systems for over fifty hospitals.

Susan Fenton photo
Susan Fenton, PhD, RHIA, CPHI, FAHIMA
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, UT School of Biomedical Informatics
Susan H. Fenton is an Associate Professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Texas School of Biomedical Informatics in Houston, TX. She is responsible for their graduate certificates, master’s and doctoral degree programs. She recently led the development of the nation’s first practice doctorate in health informatics (DHI). Dr. Fenton has received more than $7 million in grant funding and also serves on a variety of regional and national professional association committees and boards. Dr. Fenton has more than 30 years experience in health informatics and health information management. Dr. Fenton holds a B.S. in health information management from UTMB in Galveston, an MBA from the University of Houston and a PhD in health services research from Texas A&M.

Abstract
Well-known changes have already occurred in medical transcription, banking, education, and retail business. Technical forces, such as the internet, big data, increasing computational power, the Internet of Things, along with societal forces such as generational differences, disparities in access to technology, the aging of many societies, as well as emerging countries and projected changes will also impact our future workplaces. The future of the health information management profession will be explored related to these forces. Needed knowledge and skills, such as critical and creative thinking, the ability to make sense of novel situations, computational thinking, working effectively in virtual teams and across cultural and other differences to prepare for the projected future will be reviewed. Resources, such as professional associations, online training, and higher education, will be suggested for acquiring the necessary knowledge and skills.

Triple Aim & Population Health Analytics: UTMB's 1115 Journey

Kimberly Theodos photo
Kimberly Theodos, JD, MS, RHIA
Director, AHIMA Board of Directors
Kim D. Theodos, JD, MS, RHIA, is an assistant professor of Health Studies at the University of Louisiana Monroe (ULM). At ULM she teaches health informatics, healthcare leadership and healthcare administration. Previously, she taught undergraduate and graduate courses in the HIIM program at Louisiana Tech University. She has served at the state and national level in various capacities including LHIMA (Louisiana) president, treasurer and secretary, annual convention chair and education strategy manager. Theodos was a member of the AHIMA Annual Convention Program Committee for four years, serving as chair in 2015. With numerous presentations at meetings, publications and service, Theodos has been a consistent contributor to AHIMA’s HIM Body of Knowledge.

Abstract
  • Privacy & Security in a Connected World
  • The HIM professional plays a role in ensuring that all PHI is protected against breach by utilizing administrative, technical and physical safeguards. Topics in this series will include OCR Audits, HIPAA Compliance, Cybersecurity and more. These areas will also highlight regulatory laws and requirements.


Triple Aim & Population Health Analytics: UTMB's 1115 Journey

Rick Trevino
Manager, Clinical Data Management, UTMB-Galveston
Rick Trevino is the manager of the Clinical Data & Analytics team in Clinical Data Management. His team is responsible for delivering solutions and insights to drive decision-making in population health, patient satisfaction, patient outcomes and operational domains.

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Andrew Herndon, MHA
Senior Business Manager, Office of the President, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
Andrew Herndon is a Senior Business Manager for The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston, Texas. With work experience in both research and project management, Andrew’s career has taken him to the United States Department of Agriculture and now UTMB. With a strong focus on project management and efficiency, he hopes to better UTMB and Regional Healthcare Partnership (RHP) 2 through meaningful interventions identified through innovative healthcare data analysis.

Andrew joined UTMB in 2014 and began working on Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) project management and regional anchor report consulting. With exceptional results over the last five years, Andrew is Epic Certified and working towards real time data delivery and intervention support at UTMB for population health initiatives.

Andrew holds a BS in Biomedical Sciences from Texas A&M University and his Masters of Health Administration from The Texas A&M School of Public Health. He is a native Texan and resides in Hitchcock, Texas with his wife Nikki.

Carlos Clark
Chief Medical Information Officer, UTMB-Galveston
Dr. Clark joined the faculty in 2008 after completing his residency at UTMB in Galveston. He was appointed the medical director of the Internal Medicine residency clinic and has been restructuring the clinic to provide quality care for the patients and the best learning environment for the residents.

Dr. Clark is heavily involved with quality improvement efforts in the clinics as well as the hospital. He gained training in the field of health care quality by attending the MD Anderson Cancer Center Clinical Safety and Effectiveness course. Some of his current quality improvement projects include: decreasing the smoking rate among clinic patients, improving communication between doctor and their patients in the primary care clinics, improving the transition of care for hospitalized patients on Warfarin, and improvement of diabetes care in ambulatory clinic.

He currently attends on the wards in John Sealy Hospital and the TDCJ hospital, is a faculty preceptor in the Daniel's Resident Clinic, and sees private patients with the Harborside Medical Group (UHC building).

He began serving as the chief medical information officer at UTMB Health in February 2012.

Dan Heinmiller
DOS Mart Products, VP, Health Catalyst
Bio Coming Soon.

Abstract
To cope with challenges in assessing and improving the health of our patient population, UTMB in collaboration with Health Catalyst developed a solution that delivers accurate, relevant and timely data to fill this need.

The UTMB Health Population Metrics Application is aimed at Primary Care Clinical Program leaders, primary care providers and care coordinators working in ambulatory settings, quality improvement teams, and staff responsible for reports related to the organization’s status as an Accountable Care Organization (ACO). The application focuses on providing data to help organizations review population health; compare their performance to national benchmarking standards for specific measures; identify opportunities for costs savings, and help practices track, monitor, and meet the needs of high-risk patients.

The ability to identify patients among the 30+ chronic disease and prevention measures in one analytic platform enables clinicians to plan for screenings, tests or other patient interventions in accordance with established industry quality metrics.

Specific requirements of the 1115 waiver program are also addressed, enabling a more streamlined reporting and auditing support process.

Lock Your Backdoor: Best Practices to Safeguard Your PHI in the Hands of Business Associates

Bill Wagner, CHPS, CPCO
Chief Operations Officer, KIWI-TEK, LLC
Bill Wagner is the Chief Operations and Security Officer for KIWI-TEK, LLC. He is a Certified Professional Compliance Officer through the AAPC and is Certified in Healthcare Privacy and Security through AHIMA. In his role, Bill oversees all coding operations for the company’s outsourced domestic coding services for hospitals, health systems, and physician practices. In addition, he serves as security officer to ensure all protected health information (PHI) managed by KIWI-TEK on behalf of its client sites is protected and secure.

As a national speaker and author, Bill maintains deep industry knowledge and awareness of evolving medical record coding, revenue cycle, and privacy and security rules that impact healthcare providers and their business associates. Bill holds a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Indiana University Bloomington.

Abstract
While business associates are often long-time trusted partners, relationships with a large number of users with open access to patient data create significant patient privacy monitoring challenges. Reports show that over 35 percent of breaches related to patient data, involve third party vendors. In short, third-party vendors and business associates pose an alarming risk to patient data.

OCR has deemed it the responsibility of covered entities to protect patient data, therefore, healthcare organizations must understand the risk and vulnerabilities for each contracted vendor with access to PHI. This session identifies common risks related to business associates with access to protected health information (PHI); the latest OCR and ONC legislation regarding security risk assessments for business associates; and vendor risk management best practices to identify, assess, manage and continuously monitor third-party security risks. Recommendations for stronger BA agreements are shared along with must-have contract terms to mitigate breach risk. Finally, attendees discuss real-world examples of third-party vendor and BA breaches including fines, outcomes and what could have been done to prevent the event.

Ensuring Medical Necessity: The Overarching Criteria of Evaluation and Management Documentation

Caroline Whitlock photo
Caroline Whitlock
Sr. Compliance Consultant, Baylor Scott & White HealthTexas Provider Network
Caroline Whitlock is a Sr. Compliance Consultant at BSW HealthTexas Provider Network in Dallas, Texas. She has more than 23 years of experience in healthcare compliance, auditing, coding, teaching, data quality and operation in the outpatient arena.

Caroline has a Master of Business Administration form the Texas Woman’s University and she is Certified in Health Care Compliance (CHC), Certified Internal Forensic Healthcare Auditor (CIFHA), Certified Healthcare Auditor (CHA), Certified Professional Coder (CPC) and an AAPC Fellow. She is also a past president of the Dallas Central Texas Chapter of Professional Coders.  

Jennie Moodly photo
Jennie Moody
Supervisor of Physician Coding Compliance, Baylor Scott & White HealthTexas, Provider Network
Jennie Moody, is currently a Physician Compliance Auditor for Baylor Scott & White HealthTexas Provider Network. She has worked for Baylor Scott & White for 14 years. She is currently certified in Healthcare Compliance, and also holds CPC, COC and CRC certifications. Jennie has worked in healthcare for over 20 years with experience in physician office, billing, coding and compliance. During her career, she has worked with all specialties ranging from Internal Medicine to Oncology to GI to Orthopedics and a variety of other specialties.

Abstract
  1. How EMR contributes to lack of medical necessity, even with a documented visit
    • Copy & Paste
    • Templates
  2. How to have the difficult discussions with the providers when medical necessity is not clearly present in the documentation
    • Providing feedback and documentation tips to ensure medical necessity is well documented
  3. How auditors validate/locate medical necessity (and it’s not always in the Medical Decision Making)
    • Tips to uncover medical necessity in the history and exam